Starlink Satellite Internet Technology

hasnain

New member
SpaceX planning to send 12000+ satellites to the lower earth orbit to provide broadband internet system to meet the needs of consumers across the globe. Starlink ultimately aims to provide low-cost, high speed broadband connectivity to customers globally, with the specific goal of offering service to customers who don’t currently have reliable or quality access due to their remote location. A number of satellite and other projects aim to address this gap, including Alphabet-owned Loon, which is using stratospheric balloons to act as cell towers to provide access to hard-to-reach places.

Some people think starlink is more important then 5G technology and Elon Musk do not spend his money on advertisement that's why people don't know about this so much.
 

msiqbal

New member
SpaceX planning to send 12000+ satellites to the lower earth orbit to provide broadband internet system to meet the needs of consumers across the globe. Starlink ultimately aims to provide low-cost, high speed broadband connectivity to customers globally, with the specific goal of offering service to customers who don’t currently have reliable or quality access due to their remote location. A number of satellite and other projects aim to address this gap, including Alphabet-owned Loon, which is using stratospheric balloons to act as cell towers to provide access to hard-to-reach places.

Some people think starlink is more important then 5G technology and Elon Musk do not spend his money on advertisement that's why people don't know about this so much.
Starlink is a satellite constellation being constructed by SpaceX to provide satellite Internet access. The constellation will consist of thousands of mass-produced small satellites in low Earth orbit, working in combination with ground transceivers. that's why it's better than everything else in today's technological advancement era.
 

hasnain

New member
Starlink internet beta version will be available very soon, says Elon Musk

Elon Musk says SpaceX's enterprising Starlink satellite internet setup has made big steps toward providing fast internet to previously low-priority areas. Musk’s Starlink plan accounts for an eventual 40,000 satellites in orbit to blanket the globe in internet coverage, far surpassing any existing satellite internet service.

In the near term, however, Musk has said his goal for Starlink is to get to communities that have had almost no internet options until now. For these communities, Musk says, the “private beta” testing phase should begin in a few months, with a public beta in six months.


Like Musk’s battery farm in rural South Australia, Starlink has always been a solution to help mostly rural, underserved communities. While rollouts of faster and better internet infrastructure have started in cities—often in university towns and government laboratory areas—places with small populations and no research facilities are last in the pecking order. Something like a third of rural Americans still don’t have high-speed internet as an option.

The broadband internet network that covers the U.S. is like a circulatory system. Major arteries run from big city to big city, then smaller branches cover those cities and extend to nearby suburbs and exurbs. Hubs in those smaller cities branch out to reach more towns.

People in the smallest communities, whether unincorporated developments or farmhouses, must often be reached one at a time. They end up being the costliest places to reach with service.

To circumvent that entire system, Musk and satellite internet providers before him have simply put the internet into space—so instead of waiting for a physical line to reach them, these customers have internet rain on them from above. Like satellite TV, this has always been wireless by nature. But to put enough satellites in orbit to cover the world requires a huge investment in infrastructure in space. This is where Musk’s planted thousands of Starlink satellites have an advantage.

When Musk says high latitudes first, he’s addressing a specific problem that satellite internet has had for decades. Because of the way most satellites orbit, these services have been much better for people at lower latitudes. Commercials for these services, in the Northern Hemisphere at least, say outright that “all you need is a view of the southern sky.” But half the world’s population lives above 27 degrees of latitude—that’s nearly four degrees higher than even the Tropic of Cancer.
 
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